Itinerary

Aug 17, Saturday

Vienna, Austria

Embarkation 02:30pm

Overnight

Aug 18, Sunday

Vienna, Austria

12:00pm

Aug 19, Monday

Krems, Austria

08:00am

01:00pm

Aug 19, Monday

Spitz, Austria

02:30pm

03:30pm

Aug 20, Tuesday

Linz, Austria

08:00am

11:00pm

Aug 21, Wednesday

Melk, Austria

08:00am

02:00pm

Aug 22, Thursday

Bratislava, Slovakia

08:00am

07:00pm

Aug 23, Friday

Budapest, Hungary

09:00am

Overnight

Aug 24, Saturday

Budapest, Hungary

Disembark am

 

 

Dürnstein: Pearl of the Wachau Valley

This is one of Austria’s loveliest small towns. Dürnstein is perched on a ridge overlooking the Danube in Lower Austria’s Wachau Valley. In the heart of a popular wine-growing region, its Medieval stone castle (where King Richard I of England was imprisoned in 1192) stands in ruins.

Did you know? Grüner Veltliner vines grow on Danube slopes so steep that they can barely retain any soil. The result is a very pure, mineral wine that compares favorably with some of the great wines of the world.

Melk: A Baroque Showstopper

Cameras ready? Melk Abbey is a magnificent Benedictine abbey on yet another rocky outcrop overlooking the Danube. Melk Abbey has housed monks for 900 years; this largest example of Baroque architecture is Austria’s very best example.

Linz: The Mozarthaus Marvel

It’s a question that experts marvel to this day. How did the 27-year-old Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart manage to compose his Symphony No. 36 (known as Linz Symphony) during a three-day stopover here? Austria’s third-largest city is sophisticated and modern with touches of Gothic influence.

Bratislava: Capital of Slovakia

You can’t miss it. Directly on the banks of the Danube, look up on a hill to see the imposing city landmark in the form of Bratislava Castle. Rarely has one structure – even if that structure is prehistoric era castle – housed such historical significance. Formerly the treasury for the Hungarian Crown Jewels, and currently housing the Slovak Parliament (the National Council of the Slovak Republic), the castle has seen Celts, Romans and Slavs occupy it, while weathering also the Renaissance and Baroque periods. When you look at this castle, you are literally seeing thousands of years of history in brick and mortar.

Visegrád: The Danube Bend

It’s a nature lover’s paradise. Catch panoramic views as the Danube meanders. A curve in the river near Visegrád is a popular scenic landmark on the approach to Budapest. Pass between the Transdanubian Mountains and the North Hungarian Mountains, a passage that is singled out as noteworthy by UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

Budapest: Straddling the Danube

Budapest’s monuments and treasures can be seen from the Danube River

Superlatives abound. A dramatic arrival in Budapest, passing the splendid Hungarian Parliament and underneath the mid-19th century Chain Bridge, is yet another highlight of Danube River journeys. No fewer than 15 bridges cross the river in Hungary’s capital city, known as the Pearl of the Danube.

Did you know? Prior to 1873, Buda and Pest were two distinct cities sliced down the middle by the Danube. On the hilly west side, Buda is the traditional home of royalty, castles, and fortresses. Pest is the commercial hub on the east.

Aug 24, Saturday

Budapest, Hungary

Embarkation 02:30pm

Overnight

Aug 25, Sunday

Budapest, Hungary

07:00pm

Aug 26, Monday

Bratislava, Slovakia

12:00pm

06:00pm

Aug 27, Monday

Weissenkirchen, Austria

09:00am

10:00am

Aug 27, Tuesday

Melk, Austria

01:00pm

06:00pm

Aug 28, Wednesday

Linz, Austria

08:00am

10:00pm

Aug 29, Thursday

Krems, Austria

10:00am

11:00pm

Aug 30, Friday

Vienna, Austria

08:00am

Overnight

Aug 31, Saturday

Vienna, Austria

Disembark am

 

 

Dürnstein: Pearl of the Wachau Valley

This is one of Austria’s loveliest small towns. Dürnstein is perched on a ridge overlooking the Danube in Lower Austria’s Wachau Valley. In the heart of a popular wine-growing region, its Medieval stone castle (where King Richard I of England was imprisoned in 1192) stands in ruins.

Did you know? Grüner Veltliner vines grow on Danube slopes so steep that they can barely retain any soil. The result is a very pure, mineral wine that compares favorably with some of the great wines of the world.

Melk: A Baroque Showstopper

Cameras ready? Melk Abbey is a magnificent Benedictine abbey on yet another rocky outcrop overlooking the Danube. Melk Abbey has housed monks for 900 years; this largest example of Baroque architecture is Austria’s very best example.

Linz: The Mozarthaus Marvel

It’s a question that experts marvel to this day. How did the 27-year-old Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart manage to compose his Symphony No. 36 (known as Linz Symphony) during a three-day stopover here? Austria’s third-largest city is sophisticated and modern with touches of Gothic influence.

Bratislava: Capital of Slovakia

You can’t miss it. Directly on the banks of the Danube, look up on a hill to see the imposing city landmark in the form of Bratislava Castle. Rarely has one structure – even if that structure is prehistoric era castle – housed such historical significance. Formerly the treasury for the Hungarian Crown Jewels, and currently housing the Slovak Parliament (the National Council of the Slovak Republic), the castle has seen Celts, Romans and Slavs occupy it, while weathering also the Renaissance and Baroque periods. When you look at this castle, you are literally seeing thousands of years of history in brick and mortar.

Visegrád: The Danube Bend

It’s a nature lover’s paradise. Catch panoramic views as the Danube meanders. A curve in the river near Visegrád is a popular scenic landmark on the approach to Budapest. Pass between the Transdanubian Mountains and the North Hungarian Mountains, a passage that is singled out as noteworthy by UNESCO World Heritage Sites.

Budapest: Straddling the Danube

Budapest’s monuments and treasures can be seen from the Danube River

Superlatives abound. A dramatic arrival in Budapest, passing the splendid Hungarian Parliament and underneath the mid-19th century Chain Bridge, is yet another highlight of Danube River journeys. No fewer than 15 bridges cross the river in Hungary’s capital city, known as the Pearl of the Danube.

Did you know? Prior to 1873, Buda and Pest were two distinct cities sliced down the middle by the Danube. On the hilly west side, Buda is the traditional home of royalty, castles, and fortresses. Pest is the commercial hub on the east.